top of page

Breaking Free from Codependency: A Guide for Women


Welcome to my new blog.

Are you a woman who feels like you have to please others, take care of others, or fix others?

Do you feel like you have to sacrifice your own needs, wants, and feelings for the sake of others? Do you feel like you have to depend on others for your happiness, security, and identity?

Do you feel like you have to stay in a relationship that is unhealthy, abusive, or unfulfilling?

If so, you may be suffering from codependency.


Codependency is a pattern of behavior that involves losing yourself in a relationship with another person. It is a condition that affects your ability to have a healthy, balanced, and mutually satisfying relationship. It is a problem that affects your self-esteem, self-worth, and self-love. It is a trap that keeps you stuck, unhappy, and unfulfilled.


In this blog post, we will help you understand what codependency is, how it affects your relationships and your well-being, and how to break free from it. We will share with you the signs, causes, and effects of codependency, and the steps to overcome it. This blog post is based on the principles of The Queen Maker LLC, a business that helps women of all ages, backgrounds, and ethnicities discover the truth of the world and themselves. The Queen Maker LLC helps women heal from years’ worth of trauma from relationships and understand male psychology, behavior, and the psychology of relationships. The Queen Maker LLC doesn’t preach how women can cater to and support men. But rather preach why women should feel comfortable centering themselves and leaving men to their own devices.


By reading this blog post, you will be able to recognize if you are in a codependent relationship, and what you can do to change it. You will be able to reclaim your power, your voice, and your vision. You will be able to rediscover yourself, your passion, and your purpose. You will be able to break free from codependency and create the relationship and the life you deserve.


What is codependency?

Codependency is a term that was originally used to describe the relationship between an alcoholic and their partner or family member who enables their addiction. However, codependency can also apply to any relationship where one person is excessively dependent on another person for their emotional, psychological, or physical needs. Codependency can occur in romantic relationships, friendships, family relationships, or professional relationships.


Codependency is not the same as love, care, or support. Codependency is a dysfunctional and unhealthy way of relating to others that involves losing your sense of self, your boundaries, and your autonomy. Codependency is a form of addiction that makes you dependent on another person for your happiness, security, and identity. Codependency is a way of avoiding your own issues, fears, and pain by focusing on someone else’s.


Some of the signs of codependency are:

You have a low self-esteem and a poor sense of self-worth. You feel like you are not good enough, not worthy enough, or not lovable enough. You base your value on what others think of you, how they treat you, or what they can give you.


You have a high need for approval and validation. You seek constant reassurance, praise, and recognition from others. You are afraid of rejection, criticism, or abandonment. You try to please others, even at the expense of your own happiness, health, or safety.


You have a lack of boundaries and difficulty saying no. You let others cross your limits, invade your space, or disrespect your rights. You feel guilty, selfish, or bad for saying no, setting limits, or asking for what you want. You compromise your own needs, wants, and feelings for the sake of others.


You have a high sense of responsibility and a tendency to rescue, fix, or save others. You feel like you have to take care of others, solve their problems, or make them happy. You feel like you have to protect them, control them, or change them. You feel like you are the only one who can help them, or that they can’t survive without you.


You have a low sense of control and a fear of change. You feel like you have no power, no choice, or no voice in your relationship. You feel like you have to adapt, adjust, or conform to the other person’s wishes, demands, or expectations. You feel like you can’t leave, end, or change the relationship, even if it is unhealthy, abusive, or unfulfilling.


You have a high level of stress and a low level of happiness. You feel anxious, depressed, or angry most of the time. You feel drained, exhausted, or overwhelmed by the relationship. You feel like you have no time, no energy, or no interest for yourself, your hobbies, your goals, or your dreams.


These are some of the signs of codependency, but they are not the only ones. Codependency can manifest in different ways, depending on the person, the situation, and the relationship. Codependency can also vary in intensity, frequency, and duration. Codependency can be mild, moderate, or severe. Codependency can be occasional, frequent, or chronic. Codependency can be short-term, long-term, or lifelong.


What causes codependency?

Codependency is not something that you are born with. It is something that you learn, develop, and adopt over time. Codependency is often the result of your childhood experiences, your family dynamics, your cultural influences, or your personal traumas. Codependency is a way of coping with your unmet needs, your unresolved issues, or your unhealed wounds.


Some of the causes of codependency are:

You grew up in a dysfunctional family where there was abuse, neglect, addiction, violence, or instability. You learned to survive by taking care of others, hiding your feelings, or avoiding conflicts. You learned to adapt to the chaos, unpredictability, or inconsistency of your environment. You learned to ignore your own needs, wants, and feelings, and focus on the needs, wants, and feelings of others.


You grew up in a family where there was enmeshment, overprotection, or over-involvement. You learned to depend on others for your happiness, security, and identity. You learned to seek approval, validation, and recognition from others. You learned to sacrifice your own needs, wants, and feelings for the sake of others. You learned to lose yourself in the relationship with others.


You grew up in a family where there was a lack of love, affection, or attention. You learned to crave for love, acceptance, and belonging. You learned to settle for less, tolerate more, or give up more. You learned to attach yourself to anyone who showed you some interest, care, or support. You learned to cling to the relationship with others.


You experienced trauma, abuse, or loss in your life. You learned to cope with your pain, fear, or grief by escaping, numbing, or denying your emotions. You learned to rely on others for your comfort, relief, or distraction. You learned to trust others more than yourself. You learned to attach yourself to the relationship with others.


These are some of the causes of codependency, but they are not the only ones. Codependency can also be influenced by your personality, your temperament, your beliefs, your values, or your expectations. Codependency can also be triggered by your current circumstances, your life events, your relationship issues, or your partner’s behavior.


What are the effects of codependency?

Codependency is not a harmless or harmless condition. It is a serious and harmful problem that can affect your physical, mental, and emotional well-being. It can also affect your relationships, your work, and your life. Codependency can have negative and lasting consequences for yourself and others.


Some of the effects of codependency are:

You lose your sense of self, your identity, and your individuality. You forget who you are, what you want, and what you feel. You become a reflection, an extension, or a shadow of the other person. You lose your confidence, your independence, and your autonomy.


You lose your sense of balance, your harmony, and your peace. You become obsessed, consumed, or addicted to the relationship. You neglect your own needs, wants, and feelings. You neglect your other relationships, your hobbies, your goals, or your dreams. You neglect your health, your happiness, and your well-being.


You lose your sense of reality, your perspective, and your judgment. You become distorted, deluded, or deceived by the relationship. You deny, rationalize, or justify the problems, the conflicts, or the abuse. You blame yourself, others, or the circumstances for the situation. You make excuses, lies, or promises that you can’t keep.


You lose your sense of joy, your passion, and your purpose. You become unhappy, dissatisfied, or unfulfilled by the relationship. You feel empty, lonely, or bored. You feel hopeless, helpless, or worthless. You feel angry, resentful, or bitter. You feel depressed, anxious, or suicidal.

These are some of the effects of codependency, but they are not the only ones.


How to overcome codependency?

Overcoming codependency is not easy, but it is possible. It is not a one-time event, but a continuous process. It is not a destination, but a journey. It is not something that you do, but something that you become.


Here are some steps to overcome codependency:

Acknowledge your codependency. The first step to overcoming codependency is to admit that you have it. Don’t deny, ignore, or suppress your codependency. Don’t judge, criticize, or shame yourself for having it. Don’t let your codependency control, limit, or define you. Instead, acknowledge your codependency, accept it, and embrace it. Recognize that your codependency is normal, natural, and human. Understand that your codependency is a sign of your care, your value, and your potential. Appreciate that your codependency is a challenge, an opportunity, and a gift.


Identify the source of your codependency. The second step to overcoming codependency is to find out where it comes from. Don’t assume, guess, or generalize your codependency. Don’t blame, project, or externalize your codependency. Don’t let your codependency overwhelm, confuse, or paralyze you. Instead, identify the source of your codependency, analyze it, and understand it.


Ask yourself questions such as:

What is the root cause of my codependency? How did it develop over time?

How does it affect my relationships and my well-being?

What are the benefits and costs of my codependency?

What are the beliefs and values that support my codependency?

What are the fears and needs that drive my codependency?


Challenge your codependency. The third step to overcome codependency is to question its validity, accuracy, and usefulness. Don’t believe, accept, or follow your codependency. Don’t let your codependency distort, deceive, or manipulate you. Don’t let your codependency stop, block, or sabotage you. Instead, challenge your codependency, doubt it, and refute it. Use logic, reason, and evidence to counter your codependency. Use facts, data, and examples to disprove your codependency. Use positive, affirming, and empowering statements to replace your codependency. For example, instead of saying “I need to take care of others, solve their problems, or make them happy”, you can say “I choose to take care of myself, solve my own problems, and make myself happy”.


Change your codependency. The fourth step to overcome codependency is to modify it, reduce it, or eliminate it. Don’t avoid, escape, or run away from your codependency. Don’t let your codependency intimidate, dominate, or defeat you. Don’t let your codependency prevent, delay, or hinder you. Instead, change your codependency, confront it, and overcome it. Use action, decision, and result to change your codependency. Use trial, error, and feedback to change your codependency. Use strategies, techniques, or habits that work for you, such as therapy, counseling, coaching, or self-help. For example, instead of staying in a codependent relationship, you can try to end it, change it, or improve it.


Repeat the process. The fifth step to overcoming codependency is to repeat the previous steps as many times as necessary until you feel comfortable, confident, and empowered to have healthy, balanced, and mutually satisfying relationships. Don’t expect to overcome your codependency overnight, in one go, or once and for all. Don’t let your codependency come back, resurface, or reappear. Don’t let your codependency discourage, demotivate, or defeat you. Instead, expect to overcome your codependency gradually, progressively, and consistently. Expect your codependency to change, diminish, or disappear. Expect your codependency to motivate, inspire, or empower you. Remember that overcoming your codependency is not a destination, but a journey. Remember that overcoming your codependency is not something that you do, but something that you become.


These are some steps to overcome codependency, but they are not the only ones. You can also seek help, support, or guidance from others, such as your friends, family, mentors, coaches, therapists, or The Queen Maker LLC. You can also use other tools, resources, or methods that work for you, such as books, podcasts, videos, courses, workshops, or events. You can also create your own strategies, techniques, or habits that suit you, such as affirmations, meditation, journaling, or self-care.


The most important thing is to take action and to keep taking action until you overcome your codependency. Remember that you have the support and guidance of The Queen Maker LLC, a business that helps you discover the truth of the world and yourself. You have the courage, confidence, and power to overcome your codependency. You have the queen within you.

If you enjoyed this blog post, please share it with your friends and family. You can also follow us on social media for more tips and resources on how to heal, grow, and thrive as a woman. You can also visit our website www.princellathequeenmaker.com to learn more about our services and how we can help you on your healing journey.




FOLLOW



The Queen Maker LLC Houston, TX 77450, USA


The Queen Maker Logo

244 views
bottom of page